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Opa-locka Hurricane Shutters (Accordion, Roll, Storm Panels)

Hurricane Accordion Shutters Opa-locka FLMinimize hurricane damage with installation of: Accordion Storm Shutters, Hurricane Roll Shutters, Hurricane Shutter High-Rise Installation, Hurricane Storm Panel Shutters and Colonial & Bahama Aluminum Shutters in Opa-locka, Miami-Dade County, FL. Hurricanes and ferocious storms pass through South Florida every year. Because of this, you should protect your residential or commercial property with the right type of hurricane damage prevention windows and doors to protect against high velocity winds. If a window or door breaks, you run the risk of significant property damage, or even personal injury. Many buildings cannot withstand the pressure differences caused by strong winds.

Have property near Opa-locka or Miami-Dade County, Florida? Contact Us for a FREE ESTIMATE.

We can help you minimize damage related to hurricanes by the installation of:
Hurricane Roll Down Shutters Opa-locka FLHurricane Accordion Storm Shutters
Hurricane Rolling Shutters
Hurricane Roll Down Shutters
Hurricane Roll Up Shutters
Hurricane Shutter High-Rise Installation
Storm Panel Hurricane Shutters
Colonial and Bahama Aluminum Hurricane Shutters

Ask us about: Miami-Dade County Windstorm Insurance Mitigation Credits: Opening Protection

Hurricane Accordion Storm Shutters

Hurricane Accordion Shutters Opa-locka FLAccordion shutters are a permanently installed storm shutter system designed for both protection from the elements (such as hurricanes) and home / office security. They fold back to stack neatly next to the opening similar to a louvered door and are composed of one or two pieces. Accordion storm shutters are great for windows and doors, balconies, large patio openings, and commercial high-rise buildings.

Roll Shutters

Hurricane Roll Down Shutters Opa-locka FLRoll shutters are installed above an opening and are raised and lowered using an electronic motor. The system can also be activated manually by crank. When built into a new home, roll down shutters are virtually invisible. While in the closed position, they not only provide storm protection, but they also protect from forced entry and theft. When not in use, they store in an enclosed box located at the top of the opening.

Bahama Aluminum Shutters

Bahama Aluminum Shutters Opa-locka FLBahama hurricane shutters hinge at the top and have adjustable arms allowing the shutters to be positioned at various angles. If privacy and/or relief from the Florida sun is desired, Bahama shutters can be positioned within the window opening. During hurricanes and storms, simply lower the shutter into the vertical position and secure with locking pins. Bahama shutters are the premiere choice for windows on multi-story buildings because they can easily be locked from inside.

Colonial Aluminum Shutters

Colonial Aluminum Shutters Opa-locka FLColonial Shutters are similar to Bahama Shutters except they hinge on the sides as opposed to hinging at the top. To secure Colonial shutters for hurricanes, simply close each half of the shutter and secure with a horizontal storm bar. The storm bar fits into brackets that are permanently attached to the non-decorative side of the shutter and are secured with locking pins.

Storm Panels

Storm Panels Opa-locka FLSteel, aluminum or polycarbonate storm panels attach to the walls around windows and doors on bolts or tracks. Storm panels are corrugated, and each piece overlaps the next for maximum strength. There are several styles of storm panels to choose from.

High Rise Installation near Opa-locka, FL

High Rise Installation near Opa-locka, FLWe provide hurricane shutter installation for specialized high-rise buildings and condominiums. We realize that it benefits all parties involved to have a project completed in as short a timeline as possible without sacrificing quality installations.

Opa-locka FL

Opa-locka Florida MapOpa-locka is a city located in Miami-Dade County, Florida. As of the 2010 U.S. Census, the population was 15,219. The city was developed by aviation pioneer Glenn Curtiss in 1926 and was based on a One Thousand and One Nights theme, with streets that have names like Sabur Lane, Sultan Avenue, Ali Baba Avenue, Perviz Avenue and Sesame Street. Opa-locka, Florida, has the largest collection of Moorish Revival architecture in the Western hemisphere. The name Opa-locka is an abbreviation of a Seminole place name, spelled “Opa-tisha-wocka-locka.” The original name probably signified a wooded hammock in a swamp. While the 1926 Miami hurricane badly damaged Opa-locka and brought the Florida land boom to a halt, several Moorish-style buildings survived. Twenty of the original Moorish Revival architecture buildings have been listed on the National Register of Historic Places as part of the Opa-Locka Thematic Resource Area. Amelia Earhart launched her historic trip around the world from Miami Municipal Airport, just south of Opa-locka. The famous German dirigible Graf Zeppelin visited the NAS Miami, which later became Opa-locka Airport, as a regular stop on its Germany-Brazil-United States scheduled route. In addition to the unique buildings, Opa-locka has a large general aviation airport, three parks, two lakes and a railroad station which is currently the tri-rail station. The city is a mixture of residential, commercial and industrial zones. Despite its limited resources, the city was the backdrop for the making of movies such as Texas Justice, Bad Boyz II and 2 Fast 2 Furious. Miami Gardens FL is to the north. North Miami FL is to the east. Hialeah FL is to the south. Miami Lakes FL is to the west.

Miami Hurricane of 1926

Miami Hurricane 1926

The 1926 Miami Hurricane (or Great Miami Hurricane) was a Category 4 hurricane that devastated Miami in September 1926. The storm also particularly damaged Sanibel Island, Florida Panhandle, Alabama, and the Bahamas. The storm’s enormous regional economic impact helped end the Florida land boom of the 1920s and pushed the region on an early start into the Great Depression. The Cape Verde-type hurricane formed on September 6. Moving west-northwest while traversing the tropical Atlantic, the storm later passed near St. Kitts on September 14. By September 17 it was battering the Bahamas, impacting the Turks and Caicos Islands with winds estimated at 150 mph (240 km/h). Then, in the early morning hours of September 18, it made landfall just south of Miami between Coral Gables and South Miami as a devastating Category 4 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale. The storm crossed the peninsula south of Lake Okeechobee, entered the Gulf of Mexico, and made another landfall near Mobile, Alabama as a Category 3 hurricane on September 20 before hooking westward along coastal Alabama and Mississippi, eventually dissipating on September 22 after moving inland over Louisiana. In Florida, winds on the ground were reported around 145 mph (233 km/h) and the pressure measured at 930 mbar (27.46 inHg). Most of the coastal inhabitants had not evacuated, partly because of short warning (a hurricane warning was issued just a few hours before landfall). A 15-foot (4.6 m) storm surge inundated the area, causing massive property damage and some fatalities. As the eye of the hurricane crossed over Miami Beach and downtown Miami, many people believed the storm had passed. Some tried to leave the barrier islands, only to be swept off the bridges by the rear eyewall. “The lull lasted 35 minutes, and during that time the streets of the city became crowded with people,” wrote Richard Gray, the local weather chief. “As a result, many lives were lost during the second phase of the storm.” Inland, Lake Okeechobee experienced a high storm surge that broke a portion of the dikes, flooding the town of Moore Haven and killing many. This was just a prelude to the deadly 1928 Okeechobee Hurricane, which would cause a massive number of fatalities estimated at 2,500 around the lake. Between 25,000 and 50,000 people were left homeless, mostly in the Miami area. The damage from the storm was immense; few buildings in Miami or Miami Beach were left intact. The toll for the storm was $100 million ($1.3 billion 2013 USD). It is estimated that if an identical storm hit in the year 2005, with modern development and prices, the storm would have caused $140–157 billion in damage. After the hurricane, the Great Depression started in South Florida, slowing recovery. In response to the widespread destruction of buildings on Miami Beach, John J. Farrey was appointed chief building, plumbing and electrical inspector. He initiated and enforced the first building code in the United States, which more than 5000 US cities duplicated. The University of Miami, located in Coral Gables, Florida, had been founded in 1925 and opened its doors for the first time just days after the hurricane passed. The university’s athletic teams were nicknamed the Hurricanes in memory of this catastrophe.

Opa-locka, Miami-Dade County, Florida, Hurricane Storm Shutters (Accordion, Roll, Panels) and General Contractor

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Other Info
Hurricane Management Group Logo Hurricane Management Group
Opa-locka, FL
Phone: (305) 440-0030

Contact Person:
Hurricane Accordion Shutters Opa-locka Opa-locka Hurricane Shutters (Accordion, Roll, Storm Panels)

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