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North Bay Village FEMA Flood Barriers & Panels For Homes, Doors, Permanent

North Bay Village FEMA Flood Control Door BarrierHurricane Management Group provides FEMA approved flood protection barriers and panels for residential and commercial use. These flood panels and barriers could be temporary or permanent. HMG provides installation, repair, and replacement for residential or commercial high-rise buildings in North Bay Village, Miami-Dade County and throughout South Florida to improve protection against flash floods, improve flood control, and reduce flood damage for those who live in tsunami, hurricane storm surge and flood zones & flood plains. Both FEMA (Federal Emergency Management Agency) and property insurance companies encourage the use of flood control barriers and panels to protect against both property damage and human casualty.

We can assist you with the design and installation of your hurricane management project to help achieve your goals. We make the entire process as effective and professional as possible, and provide you with options so that you can make the best informed decision possible. Also, we have built strong professional relationships with flood barrier and panel manufacturers. This allows us to provide quality flood protection barriers and panels at lower prices than our competition.

Types of Flood Protection:

– FEMA Flood Panels
– Flood Door Barriers
– Flood Water Barriers
– Flood Control Barriers
– Flood Defense Barriers
– Flood Barriers for Doors
– Automatic Flood Barriers
– Flood Protection Barriers
– Residential Flood Barriers for Homes

Have property near North Bay Village or Miami-Dade County, Florida?
Contact Us for a FREE ESTIMATE.
Miami-Dade County: (305) 440-0030

North Bay Village, FL

North Bay Village Florida MapNorth Bay Village is a city located in Miami-Dade County, Florida. As of 2010, the population recorded by the U.S. Census Bureau was 7,137. According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 0.837 square miles (2.17 km2) in which 60.31% is water. Prior to 1940, most of what is now North Bay Village lay beneath the waters of Biscayne Bay. The only dry land was Broadcast Key, a 5-acre (20,000 m2) island from which pioneer radio station WIOD began broadcasting in 1926. Today, television station WSVN-TV maintains its headquarters at this same site, now joined with Treasure Island. In 1940, dredging and bulk-heading created North Bay Island. By 1941, palm-lined streets had been laid out, and 12 homes had been built and occupied. Today, the island has grown into a lush neighborhood of attractive single-family residences. Treasure Island, whose street names were drawn from Robert Louis Stevenson’s novel Treasure Island, is a mixture of single-family dwellings on the westerly end and multi-family dwellings on the eastern end. North Bay Village FL was incorporated in 1945. Harbor and Treasure Islands were annexed several years later. Broadcast Key, also known as Cameo Island, was annexed in 1963. North Bay Village became widely known for its popular restaurants and nightclubs, which attracted celebrities like Frank Sinatra and Judy Garland. Dean Martin had a night-club in North Bay Village in the late 1970s and early 1980s called Dino’s. It was next to Jilly Rizzo’s club, Jilly’s. Most construction in North Bay Village since the year 2000 has been in the erection of high-rise luxury condominium buildings. Surfside FL and North Beach FL are to the east. North Miami Beach FL is to the north. Hialeah FL is to the west. Key Biscayne FL is to the south.

Miami Hurricane of 1926

Miami Hurricane 1926.

The 1926 Miami Hurricane (or Great Miami Hurricane) was a Category 4 hurricane that devastated Miami in September 1926. The storm also particularly damaged Sanibel Island, Florida Panhandle, Alabama, and the Bahamas. The storm’s enormous regional economic impact helped end the Florida land boom of the 1920s and pushed the region on an early start into the Great Depression. The Cape Verde-type hurricane formed on September 6. Moving west-northwest while traversing the tropical Atlantic, the storm later passed near St. Kitts on September 14. By September 17 it was battering the Bahamas, impacting the Turks and Caicos Islands with winds estimated at 150 mph (240 km/h). Then, in the early morning hours of September 18, it made landfall just south of Miami between Coral Gables and South Miami as a devastating Category 4 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale. The storm crossed the peninsula south of Lake Okeechobee, entered the Gulf of Mexico, and made another landfall near Mobile, Alabama as a Category 3 hurricane on September 20 before hooking westward along coastal Alabama and Mississippi, eventually dissipating on September 22 after moving inland over Louisiana. In Florida, winds on the ground were reported around 145 mph (233 km/h) and the pressure measured at 930 mbar (27.46 inHg). Most of the coastal inhabitants had not evacuated, partly because of short warning (a hurricane warning was issued just a few hours before landfall). A 15-foot (4.6 m) storm surge inundated the area, causing massive property damage and some fatalities. As the eye of the hurricane crossed over Miami Beach and downtown Miami, many people believed the storm had passed. Some tried to leave the barrier islands, only to be swept off the bridges by the rear eyewall. “The lull lasted 35 minutes, and during that time the streets of the city became crowded with people,” wrote Richard Gray, the local weather chief. “As a result, many lives were lost during the second phase of the storm.” Inland, Lake Okeechobee experienced a high storm surge that broke a portion of the dikes, flooding the town of Moore Haven and killing many. This was just a prelude to the deadly 1928 Okeechobee Hurricane, which would cause a massive number of fatalities estimated at 2,500 around the lake. Between 25,000 and 50,000 people were left homeless, mostly in the Miami area. The damage from the storm was immense; few buildings in Miami or Miami Beach were left intact. The toll for the storm was $100 million ($1.3 billion 2013 USD). It is estimated that if an identical storm hit in the year 2005, with modern development and prices, the storm would have caused $140–157 billion in damage. After the hurricane, the Great Depression started in South Florida, slowing recovery. In response to the widespread destruction of buildings on Miami Beach, John J. Farrey was appointed chief building, plumbing and electrical inspector. He initiated and enforced the first building code in the United States, which more than 5000 US cities duplicated. The University of Miami, located in Coral Gables, Florida, had been founded in 1925 and opened its doors for the first time just days after the hurricane passed. The university’s athletic teams were nicknamed the Hurricanes in memory of this catastrophe.

North Bay Village, Miami-Dade County, Florida, FEMA Flood Protection Barriers & Panels For Homes, Doors, Permanent and General Contractor

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North Bay Village FL FEMA Flood Barriers, Panels
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Other Info
Hurricane Management Group Logo Hurricane Management Group
North Bay Village, FL
Phone: (305) 440-0030

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Hurricane Accordion Shutters North Bay Village North Bay Village FEMA Flood Barriers & Panels For Homes, Doors, Permanent

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